Show Info

The Gem State Stock Horse Association is set up to accommodate all levels of riders.

We welcome newcomers and top professionals alike!

We are constantly adding innovative classes that appeal to a broad scope of horseman, such as our Step Up Boxing classes and Buckaroo classes.

Gem State is also focused on growing our Youth program. These events are rapidly expanding and ensure a place for young riders to gain experience in the Cowhorse events.

Our members and show participants come from across the Northwest, including Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, and Utah.

We put on four shows and three clinics per year, including an NRCHA sanctioned 3 day show in July.

General Rules

Purpose

The Gem State Stock Horse Association (GSSHA) contests are dedicated to the promotion, development and demonstration of the reined cow horse.

The Gem State Stock Horse Association is an affiliate of the National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA). Except as modified below all classes shall be governed and judged by the current NRCHA rules and regulations.

Membership

Membership dues for the GSSHA are $35 for single person membership, $50 for a family membership. Dues paid before the first show will entitle you to ride in all GSSHA shows and be eligible for year-end awards. Both the owner of the horse and the rider must be a member of good standing to be eligible for the year-end awards. If a contestant does not wish to be a GSSHA member or compete for year-end awards, a $15 non-member fee per show will be assessed. It is the members’ responsibility to know and understand the current rules and guidelines of the GSSHA and the NRCHA as printed in the current year’s rule book.

Payment of entry fees: Payment is required when entry number is picked up. (new back numbers will be issued at EVERY show-entries must be paid in order to pick up numbers and prior to competing.) Checks must be same day bankable, in the event your check is returned, you will not earn points for that show and NRCHA rule 1.1.6 will be in effect.

Ethics

Contestants engaging in any form of misconduct, harassment, or unsportsmanlike conduct towards other contestants, show management or Judges are subject to disqualification. Contestants are not to converse with the judges, except at the riders’ meetings and beyond the exchange of normal greetings during contest, with the exception of schooling shows where the judge will be encouraged to comment on the rider’s performance. Violators of this rule are subject to disqualification. Contestant questions and concerns will be addressed to a designated rider’s representative during the contest. Contestants shall elect a “Rider’s Representative” prior to the start of a show.

Conduct

No contestant or other person shall engage in any form of misconduct or harassment towards show management, judges, employees, or livestock. Misconduct by a contestant may be grounds for disqualification. Any complaint must be officially filed with the secretary through the designated rider’s representative, immediately following the event with payment of a fee of $50. The board of directors will address the complaint. If the board finds in favor of the complainant, the fee will be refunded and appropriate action will be taken. If the board finds against the complainant, the fee will be forfeited. All decisions of the board are final.

The show committee as assigned by the board of directors has the right to disqualify or refuse entry to any contestant for violation of any rule.

Year End Points System

Year-End Points System

In a class with 5 or more shown, the first place horse will receive 5 points for the win plus one point for every horse defeated. Each succeeding place will receive 2 points less than the place before it, (i.e. 10 horses in class, 1st is 14 points, 2nd is 12 points, 3rd is 10 points, 4th is 8 points, 5th is 6 points). In classes having less than 5 entries, the first place horse will receive points equal to the number of horses shown in the class plus one point for every horse defeated (i.e.- four horses shown, 1st place receives 4 points plus 3 points for the three horses defeated, for a total of 7. Three horses shown in a class, 1st place receives five points, 2nd place receive 3 points.). To qualify for year-end awards a member must compete in at least 75% of the approved shows. In the event of a draw or 7 tie in year-end points, the cow work score of this class will accumulated for all shows and larger of the totals will break the tie. In the event a contestant cannot attend the awards banquet, the contestant is responsible for the cost of delivery and insurance of any awards won.

Points accumulated throughout the show season will be awarded to the horse in all classes except: Greener Than Grass, 500 Limited Boxing, SK Non Pro Limited, Non Pro Limited, and Youth.

Points accumulated throughout the show season in the classes: Greener Than Grass, 500 Limited Boxing, 5K Non Pro Limited, Non Pro Limited, and Youth will be awarded to the horse and rider combination.

Gem State Classes

Classes

The classes listed below may not be offered at all GSSHA shows. Show management will publish a class list prior to each show. If an offered class is to be cancelled, the show management must announce and post it 30 minutes prior to the starting of the first class.

Bridle Classes

Includes reined work, & fence work. Open to horses of any age, to be ridden in a NRCHA approved bridle. Reins with romal are required. Only one hand may be used on the reins and hands must not be changed.


Open Bridle: Open to any rider
Limited $1500 Bridle: Open to any rider that has not won more than $1500 in reined cow horse shows and limited age events.
Non Pro Bridle:
Open to approved Non Pro riders

Two-Rein Classes

Includes reined work and fence work. Open to horses of any age that have not shown in the bridle down the fence in any judged classes or events with the exception of horse sales, prior to November 16th of the current show year. These horses can be shown only one year in this class.

A horse may be shown in the two rein equipment for one year only regardless of the class it is shown in.

The rider must use an approved bit in accordance with NRCHA Rule 5.2 with an approved bosal in accordance with NRCHA Rule 5.4 and 5.5 underneath the bridle. Only one hand may be used on the reins and hands must not be changed. Any number of fingers between reins will be permitted.


Open Two-Rein: Open to any rider
Non Pro Two-Rein: Open to approved Non Pro riders

Hackamore Classes

Includes reined work, & fence work. Open to horses 5 years of age and under as of January 1st of current show year that have never been shown in a bridle or two rein down the fence at any judged classes or events with the exception of horse sales.

The rider shall use closed reins. Two hands must be on the reins, except in the herd work.


Open Hackamore: Open to any rider
Limited $1500 Hackamore: Open to any rider that has not won more than $1500 in reined cow horse shows and limited age events.
Non Pro Hackamore: Open to approved Non Pro riders

Futurity Classes

Includes herd work, reined work, & fence work. Open to 3 year old horses, as of January 1st of the current show year.

Entries must be shown in a NRCHA approved snaffle bit.

May, June & July shows are Rein & Herd only.

Fence is added at the August Show.


Open Futurity: Open to any rider
Limited $1500 Futurity: Open to any rider that has not won more than $1500 in reined cow horse shows and limited age
events.
Non Pro Futurity: Open to approved Non Pro riders.

Derby Classes

Includes herd work, reined work, & fence work. Open to 4-and 5-year old horses, as of January 1st of the current show year, to be shown in a NRCHA approved snaffle bit, or hackamore.


Open Derby: Open to any rider
Limited $1500 Derby: Open to any rider that has not won more than $1500 in reined cow horse shows and limited age events.
Non Pro Derby: Open to approved Non Pro riders

Buckaroo Classes

Includes reined work, fence work, & roping. Open to any horses of any age, using any NRCHA approved snaffle, hackamore, or bridle.


Open Buckaroo: Open to any rider.
Non Pro Buckaroo: Open to approved Non Pro riders.

Boxing Classes

Includes a reined work and single cow work (boxing) on the end of the arena.

Each contestant upon receiving a cow in the arena shall hold that cow on the prescribed end of the arena for 50 seconds, demonstrating the ability of the horse and rider to control the cow.

Time shall begin when the gate closes behind the cow after being let into the arena. The announcer or judge will signal the completion of the 50 seconds with a whistle or horn.


Greener than Grass: Open to any contestant with lifetime earnings of $250.00 or less at the start of the calendar year and has never won a class championship in any previous year (excludes youth).

Riders that have ever been down the fence in a judged cow horse event are not eligible for Greener than Grass class. The boxing will be in the full arena. Rider
is not required to own the horse they show. Open to horses of any age, using any NRCHA approved snaffle, hackamore, or bridle.

$1000 Non Pro Limited: open to approved Non Pro riders who have not earned more than $1,000 in lifetime earnings and who comply with all Non Pro eligibility rules, with the exception of the 2.1.17 ownership rule. (See Non Pro eligibility rules.)

For purposes of determining eligibility for this class, all Non Pro Limited earnings shall be computed at zero as of January 1, 2002. This class may NOT run concurrent with Non Pro Limited.

There is no fall back Provision in this class. The responsibility for eligibility lies with the competitor. If an individual feels a competitor is not eligible for a class, the
burden of proof lies with the person who protests.

Horses of 5 years of age and under as of January 1st of current show year may be shown in either a snaffle bit or hackamore. Horses of any age may be shown in the two rein equipment (for one year only) or bridle.

$5000 Non Pro Limited: Open to any Non Pro contestant with lifetime earnings of $5000 or less at the start of the calendar year. Riders cannot have earned more than $750 in fence work classes at any judged classes or events with the exception of horse sales. Riders shall be ineligible for the class upon meeting the earnings limitation.

Horses of 5 years of age and under as of January 1st of current show year may be shown in either a snaffle bit or hackamore. Horses of any age may be shown in the two rein equipment (for one year only) or bridle.

The boxing will be in the full arena.

Rider is not required to own the horse they show. This class will run concurrently with the Non Pro Limited Class. If cross-entered only 1 cattle fee will be charged.

Non Pro Limited Class: work to consist of reined work and boxing.

Open to Non Pro riders that have not earned more than $750 in fence work classes at any judged classes or events with the exception of horse sales. Riders shall be ineligible for the class upon the meeting the earnings limitation.

Horses 5 years of age and under as of January 1st of current show year may be shown in either a snaffle bit or hackamore. Horses of any age may be shown in the two rein equipment (for one year only) or bridle.

The boxing will be in the full arena.

Rider is required to own the horse they show. This class will run concurrently with the $5000 Non Pro Limited Class. If cross-entered only 1 cattle fee will be charged.

Two Year Old Reining

Reined work only. Open to 2 yr old horses, as of January 1st of the current show year. Horses must be shown in NRCHA approved snaffle bit.

Only offered at the August show.

Youth Classes

Youth Bridle: Youth 18 years and under. Includes reined work and fence work. Open to horses of any age, using any NRCHA approved bridle.

Youth Limited: Youth 18 years and under. Includes reined work and boxing. Open to horses of any age, using NRCHA approved bridle, snaffle bit, or hackamore that is age appropriate for the horse.

Little Buckaroo: Youth 8 and under. Reined work only. Open to horses of any age, using NRCHA age appropriate equipment

Step Up Boxing

No rein work. The rider will box the cow on one end of the arena. Once control has been demonstrated, rider takes the cow down the fence. The goal is to get the cow to the other end of the arena in a controlled manner.

Once at the opposite end, horse and rider again demonstrate their ability to control the cow. After control of the cow is demonstrated, horse and rider again take the cow down the fence. Once the cow has crossed the middle marker, rider will pull up and stop, completing the work.

Open to riders who meet the requirements for boxing classes.

Divisions and Eligibility

Open

Open to any rider.

Limited 1500

Open to any rider that has not won more than $1500 in reined cow horse shows and limited age events (lifetime earnings in reined cow horse events).

Non Pro

A Non Pro shall also be defined as any person, regardless of age, who is not currently receiving remuneration directly, or indirectly for showing, training, giving lessons, clinics, assisting in the training of a horse for remuneration. This does not include prize money. Payment of entry fees and/or expenses by anyone other than the Non Pro, his/her immediate family, or his/her corporation is considered remuneration.

Renumeration

Remuneration is defined as: 

a. To receive pay or financial gain for work completed.
b. Reimburse, compensate, make fair return for an action; barter.

Assisting in training shall be defined as follows:

a. Any activity that is performed while astride a horse not belonging to the Non Pro that prepares the horse to be trained, i. e. working a flag, backing in circles, side passing, two tracking etc.
b. Any activity that participates in the training of a horse not owned by the Non Pro while astride, i.e. working a cow out of herd, running and stopping, boxing a cow on the end, taking a cow down the fence, circling a cow, etc.

Acceptable activities by a Non Pro: 

a. A Non Pro, may without payment or remuneration, engage in walking, trotting, or loping for the purpose of warming up or cooling down, turning back, sitting astride a horse not owned by the Non Pro for the purpose of observing other horses perform, etc.
b. A Non Pro, may with payment or remuneration, engage in ranching, cowboying, ranch manager, pack trip guides, horseback tour guides, feedlot or sale ring operators, or activities on foot such as round pen, longeing, ground work, teaching a horse manners etc.

The above is not exhaustive in its description of the definition of “assisting in training” or “acceptable activities” but is meant to help interpret and guide the Committee and the Board in any decision with regards to Non Pro eligibility.

The NRCHA does not consider spouses of professional reined cow horse trainers, who do not teach riders or train cow horses, to have received indirect remuneration. Please refer to NRCHA rule 2-1 for complete Non Pro definition and rules.

Greener Than Grass

Open to any contestant with lifetime earnings of $250.00 or less at the start of the calendar year and has never won a class championship in any previous year {excludes youth). Riders that have ever been down the fence in a judged cow horse event are not eligible for Greener Than Grass class.

$1K Non Pro Limited

Open to any contestant with lifetime earnings of $1000 or less at the start of the calendar year. Contestants cannot have shown down the fence three times in a judged reined cow horse event.

$5K Non Pro limited

Open to approved Non Pro riders who have not earned more than $5,000 in lifetime earnings and who comply with all Non Pro eligibility rules, with the exception of the NRCHA 2.1.10 ownership rule. (See Non Pro eligibility rules.) For purposes of determining eligibility for this class, all Non Pro Limited earnings shall be computed at zero as of January 1, 2002. This class may run concurrent with Non Pro Limited. There is no fall back Provision in this class. Riders shall be ineligible for the class upon meeting the earnings limitation. The responsibility for eligibility lies with the competitor. If an individual feels a competitor is not eligible for a class, the burden of proof lies with the person who protests.

Non Pro Limited

This class is open to approved Non Pro LTD riders who comply with all Non Pro eligibility rules. Non Pro riders in this class must meet the requirements of the NRCHA 2.1.10 ownership rule. (See Non Pro eligibility rules.) After Non Pro competitors reach the age of 50, they may fall back into the Non Pro Limited class. However, they may not go down the fence again in any judged classes or events with the exception of horse sales and remain in the Non Pro Limited Class. Competitors may fall back to the Non Pro Limited Class only one time. Any rider that has not reached the age of 50 and wishes to compete in the Non Pro Limited class may petition the Board of Directors special consideration. This class may run concurrently with the $5,000 Non Pro Limited.

The show committee shall determine eligibility and all decisions of the committee are final. A horse and/or rider may be disqualified at any point in the contest if it is determined that they do not meet the eligibility requirements. All monies and prizes accumulated to that point would be forfeited. Contestants are reminded that cross-entering into any class with fence work will be counted as a
completion of fence work for their eligibility, even if the contestant does not complete the fence work portion. Cross entries shall be consistent with NRCHA rules.

Working Rules

Ties

Ties in individual classes will be broken using the high scoring fence work. Classes without fence work will use high scoring cow work. Ties in accumulated points for year-end awards are addressed in rule 5.1.

Appointments and Equipment

The snaffle bit, hackamore, or bridle may be inspected at the discretion of the judge or show officials anytime throughout the contest. Any bit or hackamore found to be in violation of NRCHA rules of the current year will result in a disqualification of the entry. An entry must be shown in the same discipline throughout any one contest (Example: a legal snaffle bit must be used in all events in any particular contest).

In the Buckaroo Class, all horses will be shown in the same saddle, bridle, and bit throughout the contest. Each contestant must wear chaps or chinks when competing. The only changes allowed will be saddle blankets and leg protections. In the Buckaroo Class, a usable rope will be carried throughout all four events. Each contestant must wear chaps or chinks when competing. Contestants must have a slick horn, no rubber is allowed on the horn.

Using Score For Multiple Classes

Contestants that wish to use the same score for multiple entries may ONLY do so if those entries are drawn together. (For example: Open Futurity and the $1500 Limited Futurity) AND have declared their intent to do so to the show secretary PRIOR to their FIRST ride. Contestants competing in classes without the same equipment or working requirements will NOT be able to use one score for both classes.

Broken Equipment

Refer to NRCHA rule 6.1.

Rider's Attire

Riders must wear a western hat, long-sleeved shirt, and riding boots. The wearing of chaps or chinks is optional in Greener Than Grass, Youth 9-11, Jr. Youth 12-15, and Little Buckaroo. While the show is in progress a rider must wear a western hat or helmet and a long sleeve shirt in the show arena.

Falls

Falls of the horse or rider will terminate the run and a score of zero will be given for that event. The fall of the horse will be defined as “all four feet in the same direction, free of the ground”. If a horse loses his hindquarters, but does not go flat and the rider is able to stay on board, he may continue the
run.

Rein Hands

Bridle: Only one hand may be used on the reins, and hands must not be changed. The second hand may hold the romal, a minimum of 12″ from the rein hand. Rule 7.6 shall follow NRCHA rule of the current year.

Training Devices

A rider shall not enter the show arena of any GSSHA approved show with any equipment other than legal NRCHA/NCHA equipment while the show is in progress. The show management, representative or judge must disqualify a contestant if he/she enters the arena with any illegal equipment and all entry fees and/or premiums pertaining to said contestant shall be forfeited.

Arena Help

Any rider(s) assisting a contestant in any of the events (herd and roping) must adhere to all the working and attire rules that apply to contestants. A rider shall not enter the show arena of any GSSHA approved show with any equipment other than legal NRCHA/NCHA equipment while the show is in progress. Chinks or chaps are optional. Refer to NRCHA rule 14.16

Spur and Romal Use

Spurring or hitting in front of the cinch at any time will be subjected to current year NRCHA judging criteria and rules.

Rider Noise

Since these cattle events simulate ranch conditions, minimal rider noise may be directed toward cattle. No profanity will be allowed.

Judging

Judging

NRCHA judging criteria will be used along with NRCHA judging cards.

Reined Work

Overview:

Horses shall work individually. Judging begins the moment the horse enters the arena. There will be no schooling from the time the horse enters the arena. A reined work must consist of the following: circles, lead changes and runs terminating in well-balanced stops straight to the line of travel, turns and a back-up of a reasonable distance with slight hesitations denoting each maneuver. NRCHA Rein Work Patterns found in this book are required for any approved NRCHA Event. The judge may deviate from traditional order of performance and he/she may also deviate from the exact printed pattern due to arena conditions. The judging ends when the rider indicates he/she is finished by coming to a complete stop. The best reined horse shall be easily guided or controlled with little or no apparent resistance. Bad manners exhibited by the horse will be penalized. All deviations from the exact given pattern must be considered a loss of control and marked down accordingly. Credit shall be given for the smoothness, finesse, attitude, quickness and authority of performing various maneuvers while using controlled speed which raises the difficulty level and makes the horse more exciting and pleasing to watch.


Circles: Circles are a controlled maneuver at the lope in the designated area of the arena. Emphasis on the scoring shall be given to the contestant exhibiting smooth, controlled figure eights with easy lead changes. Right and left circles shall have a common center line in the middle of the designated area. Circles shall be run and/or begun on the correct lead. The speed and size of the right circles shall be exactly the same as the speed and size of the left circles. The horse shall lope in an even, fluid manner with a minimum of rider contact and/or commands. Circles shall be run far enough from arena wall that it does not affect the circles.


Lead Changes: The act of changing the propelling side of the horse’s body when changing the direction traveling at a lope. The lead change must be executed at a lope with no change of speed or gait. The horse shall change leads at the exact location dictated in the pattern description and shall change in one stride. A horse shall be considered out of lead if both front and rear leads are not changed in the same stride.


Jogging: jogging up to 2 strides incurs a 1/2 point penalty, jogging beyond 2 strides will incur a 2 point penalty. Jogging in excess of one half circle or one half the length of the arena will result in a score of 0. In determining whether a 1/2 or 2 point penalty has been incurred, it is useful for a judge to consider the distance traveled and to count the steps of the rear legs. Four steps and under would represent 2 or less strides and require a 1/2 point penalty; 5 steps and more, therefore, would require a 2 point penalty.


Run-Downs: Runs lengthwise through the arena. They shall be made a described in the given pattern, unless the judge indicated otherwise due to arena conditions. The horse shall demonstrate a relaxed fluid attitude when starting a run-down and throughout the maneuver. The horse shall use
controlled speed consistent with the size of the arena and the condition of the ground. The horse shall travel in a straight line with a minimum of contact with the rider. Straight, controlled rundowns with square, smooth stops, maintaining suppleness and proper head position are desirable.


Stops: Shall be in line with the direction of travel. Horse shall have its hocks well under it during the entire stop, maintaining a proper head position and response to a light rein.


Spins: Consistent and positioned 360 degree turns executed with the inside hind quarter (pivot) remaining stationary. Spins shall be smooth and efficient. The location of the hind quarters shall be fixed at the start of the spin. The horse shall stop the spin exactly as dictated by the pattern description. The right and left spins shall have a similar speed and balance.


Back-up: The horse being caused to move in a reverse motion in a straight line for a required distance. The horse shall begin the back-up in a controlled manner and shall continue to back-up without hesitation until directed to stop by the rider. In the instance where a horse backs up where a back-up is not specified in the pattern, the penalty score of 0 will be incurred when the horse backs more than 2 full strides. It is important to note one stride is defined as the complete movement or steps of all 4 legs, one time. In this particular situation it is very helpful for a judge to watch and count the steps of the front feet. Up to and including 4 steps of the front feet in the not required backup receives no penalty; five steps and beyond constitutes the inclusion of a maneuver not specified and thus a penalty score of 0.


Hesitate: Hesitation is only long enough to show the completion of one
maneuver before the next one starts. There shall be slight hesitation to indicate each maneuver.


Definition of fall of horse: When the horse’s shoulder and hip are on the ground and all four feet are facing in one direction. Fall of horse in any event receives a score of 0.


Definition of fall of rider: Rider is no longer astride the horse.

Herd Work

Judging will begin at the time line. The contestant shall approach the herd with no hesitation, weaving or reluctance on the part of the horse to enter the herd sufficiently deep enough to show his ability to make a cut. The horse shall work quietly, but alertly, causing very little disturbance to the herd or the animal brought out. Credit will be given for driving cattle, clearing the herd by a sufficient distance and setting up a cow while holding it in a working position as near the center of the arena as possible. The degree of difficulty, eye appeal and the amount of courage in staying on a tough cow will be taken into consideration. The amount of time actually spent working cattle in the 2 1/2 minute period will have a positive effect on the total score. The horse should show a great deal of expression but no ill will toward the animal. Judging will end at the whistle. If an exhibitor is taking an excessive amount of time to get to the herd after their number is called the following will occur: the Director of Judges (if the Director of Judges is not there, then a designated judge) will contact the announcer and the announcer will give the exhibitor a “second call”. If the exhibitor still is not starting to the herd, a 15 second call will be given and then the time clock will be started. Special consideration will be given to exhibitors who helped the previous exhibitor in the herd.

Boxing Classes

The goal of this class is to introduce the rider to the “boxing” phase of the cow work. Judging begins when the contestant enters the arena. There shall be no schooling between the completion of the rein work and the cow work, or between cows if a new cow is awarded. The penalty for this is -0-. Each contestant upon receiving a cow in the arena, shall hold that cow on the prescribed end of the arena for 50 seconds, demonstrating the ability of the horse and rider to control the cow. It is legal to hold the reins and romal in one hand (rein hand) while boxing the cow. Time shall begin when the gate closes behind the cow after being let into the arena. The announcer or judge will signal the completion of the 50 seconds with a whistle or horn. The horse will be scored using the “limited cow work scoring guidelines”.

Fence Work

Cow Work: Judging begins when the contestant enters the arena. There shall be no schooling between the completion of the rein work and cow work when the cow work immediately follows the rein work; the penalty for this will be a zero. At the start of the work, each contestant, upon receiving a cow in the arena, shall hold that cow on the prescribed end of the arena for a sufficient time to demonstrate the ability of the horse to contain the cow at that end. After a reasonable amount of time, the contestant shall take the cow down the fence, making at least one turn each way on the fence. Then the contestant shall take the cow to an open part of the arena and circle the animal at least once in each direction. The required pattern for the cow work is: boxing, fence turns, and circles, in that order.

The judge should take into consideration the size of the arena, condition of the ground and disposition of the cattle in scoring each work. If ground, arena and/or weather conditions are deemed unfavorable by the exhibitors, they may inform the judge who may elect to alter the required cattle work for safety reasons.

The greater the difficulty of the run, the more credit should be given. The difficulty may be due to the extreme speed or stubbornness of the cow, or the cow’s reluctance to move down the fence when sufficiently driven by the contestant. The most controlled cow work, with the highest degree of difficulty, that exhibits good form throughout, should be marked the highest.

Bad manners exhibited by the horse will be penalized under run content.

When enough cows are available the contestant should receive a new cow if the cow drawn is unreasonably difficult or unworkable. Allowing the horse to quit working before the judge signals for a new cow will result in a zero score. Once a rider has committed to circling a cow, if the cow falls down no new cow will be awarded. The rider should complete the run by riding around the fallen cow to fulfill circling requirements.

The judge may blow his/her whistle at any time during the work. one whistle to terminate the work, two whistles to award a new cow. If the judge awards a new cow, the exhibitor has the option to refuse the new cow by continuing to work. If the exhibitor intends to accept the new cow, he or she must pull up immediately. With a multiple judge system, any one of the judges may terminate the work or signal for a new cow.

If at any time a judge feels that the contestant is out of control endangering themselves and/or their horse, the judge may terminate the work, and a score of zero will be given. In the case of an emergency (Such as a person falling into the arena or part of the arena falling apart) the judge may blow two whistles for a second time. At this point, the contestant has no option to continue and must receive a new cow. Contestant must pull up immediately or a score of zero will be given.

Judging ends when the whistle blows. A score of zero will be given if the work is not complete at that point. In the cow work phase of any class one hand on the horn may be used to prevent the fall of the rider. Holding the horn excessively may be penalized under run content.

During the cow work, when a cow leaves the working area, it is automatic that the contestant will receive a new cow and scoring will begin again with the new cow.


Boxing: Working the cow on the end of the arena until such time as the contestant has proven the ability of the horse to hold the cow. The horse should exhibit superior cow sense and natural cow working ability without excessive reining or spurring. In the head-to-head working position, the degree of difficulty shall be considered.


Turning on the fence: A fence turn is defined as a turn in which the cow, while being run down the fence on one side of the arena, or in the “open field”, is turned in a different direction and held near the same fence, or the same side of the arena, while being run in the new direction. The exhibitor must be close enough to the cow to be the cause of the turn.

The situation where a horse and rider attempt to turn the cow and the cow exits the turn behind the horse is also considered to have satisfied the fence turn requirement. The route of the cow being worked has been altered because of the influence of the horse and rider.

The actual stopping or turning of the cow by the end fence will not qualify as a fence turn. To qualify as a fence turn the turn must be accomplished without the aid of the end fences to actually stop or turn the animal being worked.

During the turn the horse should use himself in a controlled, athletic manner, using his hocks to stop and drive out of the turn, while using his front end to balance and turn. When attempting to make an open field turn, it is preferable to separate the turn from the circles. This can be accomplished by making an open field turn, then changing sides before circling, or briefly hesitating after the open field turn before attempting to circle the animal in the same direction. In either case it is important to show separation in the circle and turn maneuvers.

The contestant must get a minimum of one turn in each direction when attempting the fence work. More than two good turns in each direction should not result in extra credit but also should not be penalized, unless the cow is thereby too exhausted to circle correctly. One turn each way may not necessarily result in extra credit if the horse and/or cow are out of control.


Circling: Maneuvering the cow smoothly at least 360 degrees in each direction without interference from the fence. The circle’s size, symmetry, speed and relative balance from right and left show control. Tightening the circles down with fast head-to-head speed will be a credit situation. The circles should be completed before the cow is exhausted.

Buckaroo Classes

Roping event: The contestant will box the cow at the end of the arena, and then take the animal down the fence making at least one turn each direction. The rider must then track up, rope the cow around the neck, stop and hold the cow to demonstrate control, setting it up with a straight square stop. The rider must follow the cow out of the arena with losing his/her rope. Credit will be given to the horse that exhibits sense, tracks the cow and stops straight.


Loops: the contestant is allowed two loops to legally rope the cow. Using more than two loops, an illegal loop that is dallied, or a dropped rope will result in the contestant receiving a score of zero. Missing the first loop will incur a 3-point penalty. Missing both loops will result in a score of 60. A legal loop is around the horns or neck, or around the neck and one front leg.

Logo-bottom

FEAR NO COW

INFO@GEMSTATESTOCKHORSE.COM